Many states across the nation have enacted laws prohibiting the use of cell phones while driving. Tennessee, however, only bans them while driving through a school zone that has flashing lightsAccording to WCYB-TV News, the Volunteer State ranked worst for fatalities caused by distracted drivers. For every 10 billion vehicle miles logged, there were reportedly 7.2 fatalities between the years 2015 and 2017. The national average for distracted driving fatalities during the same time period was 1.49.  

Law enforcement officials have the authority to fine a motorist pulled over for using a handheld device while driving. For some individuals, talking on the phone while driving might not seem like a complicated matter. Distracted driving, however, involves much more than carrying on a conversation because of the use of mobile devices and the popularity of social media. 

Through the growth of technology, some individuals have developed a habit for taking photos or videos of nearly everything that they do. This includes capturing picturesmaking mini-movies and quickly uploading them to the internet for all to view. Sharing images or videos while operating a motor vehicle, however, can be distracting and very dangerousSome motorists might think that adding filters to the pictures on their cell phone is more important than avoiding a catastrophic accident.  

Any cognitive, manual or visual activity that takes a driver’s attention away from the road is a distraction, as noted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While drivers under the age of 20 are reportedly the most distracted, serious injuries and fatalities may occur involving individuals of any age. Preventing motor vehicle accidents includes staying off mobile devices while driving or using a hands-free headset connected to a holstered phone.